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Music, Art and Fun Physical Activity: Engaging in meaningful activities changes our brains!

Updated: Oct 31, 2019

Occupational Therapy is founded on the knowledge that engaging in the art of "doing" can change our brain function and our physical function. Assisting people to do the activities they need to and want to do is what occupational therapy is all about.


Countless high quality research studies have shown that musical activities enhance the structure and function of many brain areas. Music can therefore be used as a tool to assist neurological rehabilitation. This is known to be true for other complex activities such as drawing, painting, participating in sports and yoga. Engaging in activities literally changes our brain structure and function!


Occupational therapy interventions can be very diverse, ranging from teaching someone how to get dressed, how to catch a bus or writing a report to get someone a complex piece of equipment or practicing and improving handwriting skills. While continuing to offer a full range of diverse interventions, I am so pleased to now be engaging wonderful specialist subcontractor therapy assistants to work with me to provide targeted and tailored music, exercise, yoga, painting, drawing, and horse riding experiences so people receiving my occupational therapy services can achieve their goals.


Of course there are so many other benefits gained from engaging in these activities including anxiety management, increased self esteem, enjoyment (and joy!), diversion from screen time and opportunities for connecting with others over an activity.


I have experienced these benefits too while delivering these sessions and look forward to continuing to build on what is offered for therapy interventions!

Percussion Instruments


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©2018 by Michelle Dettrick-Janes, Occupational Therapist. Proudly created with Wix.com

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